Bay Area Writing Project at Expressions Gallery, Sunday November 13th

Glenn Ingersoll and I will be reading our poetry (plus a surprise) tomorrow at Expressions Gallery in Berkeley. Hosted by Marty Williams and BAWP.

Sun, November 13, 3:00pm – 4:30pm
Expressions Gallery, 2035 Ashby Ave, Berkeley, CA 94703, United States (map)
A monthly literary reading series featuring Bay Area Writing Project Teacher Consultants and other local writers reading from their own work. (Open to the Public) Expressions Gallery 3:00-4:30 p.m.
There will also be an Open Mic

 

Bay Area Writing Project Reading on Sunday November 13, 2016

I hope you can join me and Glenn Ingersoll at Expressions Gallery in Berkeley on Sunday November 13th.
There will be an open mic; contact ms.marty.will@gmail.com if you are interested in reading.
Here are the details:
The Bay Area Writing Project & Expressions Gallery
present poets Joyce Young and Glenn Ingersoll
November 13, 20163:00-4:30 p.m. 
Expressions Gallery – 2035 Ashby Avenue, Berkeley, CA
We hope to see you there!

Mantras

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There is so much noise within and around these days, with social media posts, voices and beings buzzing around in the workplace, drivers on edge, free floating anxiety. And yes, the U.S. election cycle that ends (hopefully) on Tuesday November 8 has contributed to a lot of it, but I get the feeling that there is a lot more going on. And there is definitely a lot more going on in the world that we are all a part of.

In order to help myself navigate these churning waters, I’ve created mantras that directly connect me to writing. That’s my calling, so I have to work with myself to pull back from the fracas.

Here’s what I’ve come up with so far:

What do I have to say?

Do I want to enter this particular conversation?

How can I add to the conversation?

How can I begin a new conversation?

What narrative do I want to be a part of?

What narrative do I want to create?

Are there tools that you have been using to focus your Self and your writing practice? If so, I’d love to hear from you.

Thank you for the joy in poetry

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Yesterday’s reading, interview and discussion at the Berkeley Public Library, Claremont Branch was thoroughly enjoyable. From my audience of curious and writerly folks, to being drawn to read poems about my family members, friends and neighbors from my ‘growing up days’ in Brooklyn, the hour we spent together was a gift!

The questions asked were those of folks who write and are quiet about it, those who are experienced writers and teachers, and those who wanted to know more about the poems I read and about poetry in general.

Many thanks to the Glenn Ingersoll and the Berkeley Public Library for asking me to be part of the Clearly Meant Series. You made my experience yesterday enjoyable and supported me wonderfully in publicizing the event by providing chapbooks, flyers and a Facebook event page linked to the library’s events calendar. It was this writer’s dream event!

Photos to come (lots of them) and many thanks to Jain Williams for rising to the occasion of the sudden and surprising role of event photographer. Jain, you might want to consider using the camera as an income producing side project (smile).

Poetry Reading and Discussion at the Berkeley Public Library Saturday June 25, 2016 2-3 pm

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I will be reading some of my poems, talking with host and fellow poet Glenn Ingersoll and engaging in discussion with the audience (you) at the Claremont Branch of the Berkeley Public Library, 2940 Benvenue@Ashby, tomorrow, June 25, 2016 from 2-3 pm.

This is my neighborhood library and I’m very happy to be reading there again. Please join me!

More details below:

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100Thousand Poets for Change – September 27, 2014

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I’m excited to be part of a global poetry event on this coming Saturday. Around the globe, poets, musicians, artists will be sharing their work in the service of change. Bringing art out into the world collaboratively every hour.

Here’s information about the event I’ll be participating in:

Backyards: Poets for Local Change 2014
a free poetry reading with refreshments

Saturday September 27, 7:00pm
Frank Bette Art Center,
1601 Paru Street, Alameda.

Hosted by Jeanne Lupton. Curated and MC’d by Sharon Coleman

Wilfred Galila
Kristen Hanlon
John Isles
Sara Anika Mithra
Rafael Jesús González
Vince Storti
Harold Terezon
Joyce Young

It’s uplifting stuff to be part of a global day of sharing creative work.

Are you hosting. curating, reading, performing in an event on Saturday? If so, please post a comment about it and let us know!

Don’t be that dude: Handy tips for the male academic

This post by Tenure, She Wrote is thought provoking to this academic. My colleague Clint Gardner, who is the Writing Center Coordinator at Salt Lake Community College posted it on the Peer Centered Facebook Page. I’m re-blogging it here for continued thought and discussion. I’d love to know what you think!

Tenure, She Wrote

There is a plethora of research on the causes of hostile environments for women in academia, and on why we have an underrepresentation of women in many fields. There are support groups for women, societies entirely devoted to women academics (broadly and field-specific), workshops for women in academia, and countless articles and blogs devoted to the topic.

These initiatives are important, but here’s the thing: gender equality has to be a collaborative venture. If men make up the majority of many departments, editorial boards, search committees, labs and conferences, then men have to be allies in the broader cause of equality, simply because they have more boots on the ground. And, as much as I wish it weren’t so, guys often tend to listen more readily to their fellow guys when it comes to issues like sexism. I’ve also found that there are a lot of guys out there…

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Writing Outside Your Comfort Zone—An Online Learning Experience – National Writing Project

Writing Outside Your Comfort Zone—An Online Learning Experience – National Writing Project.

This summer, I decided to hop on board an online course and community of educators led by teachers and authors Cathy Fleischer and Sarah Andrew-Vaughan called the Unfamiliar Genres Project. Their book “Writing Outside Your Comfort Zone: Helping Students Navigate Unfamiliar Genres” is the basis for the course.

Part II of the course/community is active during the month of July. Each participant chooses an unfamiliar genre to research and to write in. I’ve chosen vignettes since most of the students I work with are training to become clinical psychologists and therapists and they write papers in which they are learning to assess clients by reading and responding to vignettes. But I’ve learned through my research that vignettes are also used in Psychology and Sociology research in surveys. And I’m knee-deep in reading journal articles that describe the research and reveal the vignettes. And I’m loving it!

Of course, rereading “The House on Mango Street” is a great deal of fun as is reading “Deer Table Legs” by Katayoon Zandvakili and “Slide” by Monica Zarazua.

Katayoon’s poems are vignette-like which may be directly connected to her other creative pursuit, which is painting. And Monica’s short fiction has vignette qualities. Until I did a reading with these two writers on Wednesday, I was unfamiliar with their work. So, I’ve had pleasant synchronicities occur with this project. And I have two new books!